If you were not injured in a car accident but your vehicle sustained damage, you may still have the grounds to file a lawsuit against the other driver. Generally, a person can sue another party (i.e. the other driver, the city, the school district, trucking company, etc.) when they aren’t able to recover the compensation needed to cover the costs associated with their vehicle repairs. To give you a better idea as to when a driver might consider filing a lawsuit after a car accident that only resulted in property damage, below we describe two hypothetical situations for you.

Scenario #1

Let’s say another driver was speeding and rear-ended your vehicle. Because they were responsible for causing the accident, you would need to file a claim with their insurer in order for your vehicle repairs to be covered. However, upon filing a claim you find out that the driver has only purchased the minimum coverage their state requires them to have. Unfortunately, this isn’t enough to cover the repairs your vehicle now needs.

So, what do you do?

Well, if you live in a no-fault state, you could either file a claim with your own insurance company and hope to recoup the remaining amount you need, or you can file a civil suit against the driver. Either way, whenever an accident victim is faced with either circumstance, it is always best that they speak with a local accident attorney who can review with them the pros and cons of both options.

Scenario #2

You were involved in a wreck with a reckless driver who was violating more than one traffic laws at the time of the accident. As you attempt to exchange information with the driver, you find out that they are not insured. Although nearly every state requires its drivers to carry auto insurance, many do not comply with their state’s laws. In 2015, it was estimated that one in eight drivers was not insured and that number likely hasn’t changed much.

When involved in an accident with an uninsured driver, you should consider consulting with an accident lawyer in your city who can determine the likelihood of you winning your case should you decide to file a civil lawsuit against the driver. In some cases, it might benefit you to sue the other party and in other instances, it may be best that you file a claim under your own policy.

Aside from these two scenarios described above, you can also sue other parties such as a trucking company, school district, or even an insurance company if you aren’t able to recover the money you are due for the damage your property sustained.

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Civil lawsuits are typically filed when a driver is unable to recover the full amount of money they are due from the party who was responsible for causing the accident.

Ready to find out if you have the grounds to sue another driver after an accident?

 

If you aren’t sure whether you can file suit against another motorist or company for the accident they caused, you can always contact USAttorneys.com. We have an extensive database of accident lawyers located all throughout the U.S. who are qualified to provide you with the legal advice you are seeking. If you wish to be connected with an accident law firm in your area, contact USAttorneys now or fill out our free case evaluation form here.