car crash accident at snow road in winter

car crash accident at snow road in winter


It’s a parent’s worst nightmare, the unimaginable. Your child has been involved in a car accident and is injured. Unfortunately, in the U.S. every year, teen drivers are more likely to be killed and injured in an auto accident than by any other cause. According to the Centers for Disease Control, in 2011 alone, 2,650 teens were killed and over 290,000 were treated in the emergency room for injuries sustained in auto accidents.
Teens are most likely to be involved in an auto accident than any other age group. In fact, according to the CDC, teen drivers are three times more likely to be involved in car accidents. When these accidents occur, teen drivers can sustain serious, life threatening, or life-altering injuries. Sadly, when teen auto accidents occur, other individuals are often injured. These victims can sometimes face years of medical rehabilitation, missed time at work, and may suffer serious pain and suffering.
Normally, when an auto accident takes place, the negligent party is responsible for paying for victims’ medical care, rehabilitation, lost wages, and pain and suffering. Victims often seek the skill and counsel of an experienced personal injury attorney like Raymond Arenofsky Law Offices to ensure that they receive the maximum possible recovery under the law from the responsible driver. Yet, when teen drivers are involved in accidents, parents may find themselves responsible for their teen drivers’ actions. Victims may find themselves facing more complex litigation as a result.
In Arizona, for instance, according to Arizona State Law 28-3160 parents and guardians of underage drivers are required to sign and verify driver’s license applications for minor drivers. This means that for every underage driver on the
road with an Arizona license, a parent or guardian was required to sign in order for the underage driver to acquire a learner’s permit, or a class G or M license. In accordance with Arizona state law, the parent, parents, or guardians who sign the minor’s application for a driver’s license will be responsible for all damages caused by negligent acts or from willful misconduct of a minor driver.
Under Arizona law, parents are held to a high standard of responsibility when it comes to the actions their children take when they drive. Because children may not always be supervised when driving, parents often place a great deal of trust in their children to obey the law, drive carefully, and not commit any violation of the law that would put them at risk of a personal injury lawsuit. Because minors do not have the experience of older drivers, they may not always be aware of the full range of consequences of say, drinking and driving, driving recklessly, or speeding. When minors are found responsible for these kinds of negligent acts that result in injuries or damages, it is often the minor’s parents who will be held financially responsible for these actions.
So, what can parents do to protect themselves, their children, and other passengers and drivers on the road? Arizona’s graduated driver’s license is designed to protect teen drivers and their passengers. For instance, teen drivers with a class G license are not allowed to carry more than one underage passenger in their vehicle during the first six months unless the passengers are siblings or over 18. Teen drivers are known to be at greater risk the more passengers they have present in their vehicles. Parents should set clear ground rules for teen drivers regarding passengers in the vehicle. Until a teen driver has gained more experience, these drivers should not be carrying underage passengers.
Accident report
Parents can also treat driving as a privilege that must be earned and observe their teen closely for displays of at-risk behavior. For instance, speeding tickets, or other traffic infractions may be a sign that your teen is not ready to be driving without parental supervision. Underage drinking and driving is also another major concern. According to AZ Central, Mesa, Arizona and other counties are in the process of drafting “social host” ordinances that would seriously penalize adults who allow teens to drink in their homes. These laws place greater liability on parents who knowingly or unknowingly allow their teens to drink in their homes. Yet, when it comes to drinking and driving, parents can be held liable for their children’s negligent acts behind the wheel. Furthermore, parents might even be responsible for punitive damages if the parent was aware of the teen’s drinking habits.
Punitive damages are not limited to drinking and driving infractions. Parents could also be held accountable for punitive damages if the teen driver was found to be drag racing or engaging in other forms of gross misconduct while behind the wheel.
At the end of the day, a parent best knows his or her child, and should be the best judge of whether the child is ready to take on the serious responsibility of driving. Because of the risk of personal injury lawsuits in an auto accident, many parents choose to wait until their children turn 18 to let them apply independently for their own driver’s licenses. In this way, parents limit their personal responsibility for their teen’s actions behind the wheel.
Sadly, when teens get into accidents, victims often face serious injuries and sometimes long and expensive recovery periods. In order to protect victims of these accidents, Arizona law affords victims the right to sue a teen’s parents in the event a teen gets into an auto accident that results in personal injury or property damage. Suing a parent of a teen driver and his or her guardian may require more complex litigation than standard personal injury claims involving one driver. In teen accident cases, victims often seek the skilled representation of a personal injury lawyer to ensure that their rights are protected and that they receive proper compensation for their injuries.
For answers to your legal questions visit www.azaccidentlawfirm.com.

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